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# Episode Title Description People Date
101 The Quantum and Cosmological Scales How do we combine our theory of the very small with our theory of the largest scales of the universe? In the second part of their discussion, Jim Hartle and Bernard Carr hash out the connections between cosmology and quantum mechanics. Jim Hartle, Bernard Carr 06 Dec 2016
102 What Fine Tunings Are There? Is the universe fine-tuned for life? In the first part of their discussion, Bernard Carr and Jim Hartle discuss how physical theories might contain unexplained assumptions that are necessary for the existence of life. Bernard Carr, Jim Hartle 06 Dec 2016
103 Can bubbles help cure cancer? On this episode, can bubbles cure cancer? Eleanor Stride 02 Dec 2016
104 Mathematics: Navigating Nature's Dark Labyrinth The Inaugural Lecture of the Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science, 2009. Marcus du Sautoy 18 Nov 2016
105 Autism and Minds Wired for Science Simon Baron-Cohen, Professor of Developmental Psychopathology, Cambridge, and Director of the Autism Research Centre, gives the 2016 Charles Simonyi Lecture on new research into autism. Simon Baron-Cohen, Marcus du Sautoy 18 Nov 2016
106 The Remedy: Humanism In this episode, Naomi Richman interviews David Flint, Vice-Chair of the North London Humanists to find out what humanism can offer the sick. They discuss the role of modern medicine and the possibilities of living forever. Naomi Richman, David Flint 16 Nov 2016
107 Creative Commons How do you make a reliable weather forecast? Latest episode from Oxford Sparks, this episode on how to predict the weather. Hannah Christensen 04 Nov 2016
108 Topology and the Classification of Matter: New Physics Hidden in Plain Sight Third lecture "More is different" - how states of matter emerge from quantum theory Saturday morning of Theoretical Physics. With Professor Steve Simon, introduction by Professor John WheelerThird Steve Simon 01 Nov 2016
109 Magnets, superfluids and superconductors Second lecture "More is different" - how states of matter emerge from quantum theory Saturday morning of Theoretical Physics. With Professor Fabian Essler, introduction by Professor John Wheeler. Fabian Essler 01 Nov 2016
110 Identical particles: from one to many First lecture in the "More is different" - how states of matter emerge from quantum theory Saturday morning of Theoretical Physics. With Professor John Chalker, introduction by Professor John Wheeler. John Chalker 01 Nov 2016
111 Autism and Minds Wired for Science Simon Baron-Cohen, Professor of Developmental Psychopathology, Cambridge, and Director of the Autism Research Centre, gives the 2016 Charles Simonyi Lecture on new research into autism. Simon Baron-Cohen, Marcus du Sautoy 31 Oct 2016
112 Dark Matter, Fine-Tuned What surprising features of our theories cry out for explanation? Rocky Kolb and Rafael Alves Batista consider features of our theories that look unlikely or unnatural, and what our chances are for building a unified theory that explains them. Rocky Kolb, Rafael Alves Batista 12 Oct 2016
113 Why Now? We’re at a particularly interesting time in the evolution of the universe. Rafael Alves Batista and Rocky Kolb chat about the interesting features of our time, and why we should--or should not--expect to be living now. Rocky Kolb, Rafael Alves Batista 12 Oct 2016
114 Dark Matter Particles What sort of things could dark matter be, and how would we tell which it is? Rafael Alves Batista and Rocky Kolb review the main candidate dark matter particles, and consider our chances for telling which one is out there. Rocky Kolb, Rafael Alves Batista 12 Oct 2016
115 The Future of Dark Matter In the third part of their discussion, Celine Boehm and Justin Read mull over what we can learn from dark matter. Will understanding dark matter lead us to a small change in the standard model, or a large one? Justin Read, Celine Boehm 12 Oct 2016
116 How Does Dark Matter Act? In the second part of their discussion, Celine Boehm and Justin Read talk about how dark matter acts, both on large scales, at early times, and in small galaxies much nearer to us. Justin Read, Celine Boehm 12 Oct 2016
117 How Do We Find Dark Matter? In the first part of their discussion, Justin Read and Celine Boehm go over our evidence for dark matter and consider the possible particles that could make it up. Justin Read, Celine Boehm 12 Oct 2016
118 Dark Matter(s) Discussion Celine Boehm, Rocky Kolb, and Justin Read discuss fine-tuning in dark matter models, how we judge astrophysical parameters to be fine-tuned, how we get evidence for dark matter, supersymmetry, and our prospects for finding the dark matter particle. Celine Boehm, Rocky Kolb, Justin Read 04 Oct 2016
119 The Level of Fine-Tuning it Takes to Make a Dark Matter Model Dr. Celine Boehm (Durham) discusses the possible dark matter particles and the constraints--theoretical and experimental--on their parameter space. Celine Boehm 04 Oct 2016
120 The Decade of the Wimp Dr. Rocky Kolb (Chicago) discusses the theoretical reasons to expect dark matter to be a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP), and the prospects for finding one. Rocky Kolb 04 Oct 2016
121 Astrophysical Probes of Dark Matter Dr. Justin Read (Surrey) explains the astrophysical evidence for dark matter, and our prospects for getting more information about its nature and interaction by looking at nearby dwarf galaxies. Justin Read 04 Oct 2016
122 The Jenkin Lecture - Engineering Tomorrow's Therapies Professor Constantin Coussios (Magdalen), Professor of Biomedical Engineering, gives the 2016 annual Jenkin Lecture, on 17th September 2016. Constantin Coussios 21 Sep 2016
123 Digital health Professor Lionel Tarassenko CBE FREng FMedSci (St John’s), Head of the Department of Engineering Science, gives a lecture for the department of Engineering Science Alumni Weekend on September 17th 2016. Lionel Tarassenko 21 Sep 2016
124 Creative Commons IDEAL and the FDA Regulation, Commissioning, HTA and Policy. Danica Marinac-Dabic 19 Sep 2016
125 'Light' Part 3 - How does sunlight damage DNA? Once we've received our genetic make-up from our parents our genomes are stable, right? What causes mutations in our DNA as we live and grow, and how do our cells repair damage? Catherine Green 03 Aug 2016
126 The merits of decision modelling in the IDEAL framework The case of innovative bilateral DIEP flap surgery. Janneke Grutters 03 Aug 2016
127 New Frontiers in Cosmology In the fourth part of their discussion, Joe Silk and John Peacock conjecture about future developments in cosmology. What part of cosmology is most likely to be fruitful? This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on May 12, 2016. John Peacock, Joe Silk 13 Jul 2016
128 Dark Energy and the Multiverse In the third part of their discussion, Joe Silk and John Peacock consider approaches to dark energy. Should we accept the multiverse, or wait for a theory of quantum gravity? John Peacock, Joe Silk 13 Jul 2016
129 New Data and New Work In the second part of their discussion, Joe Silk and John Peacock discuss possible future sources of data and developments in cosmology. They conjecture about the search for dark matter and its impact on astronomy. John Peacock, Joe Silk 13 Jul 2016
130 New Statistics and Prediction In the first part of their discussion, Joe Silk and John Peacock compare approaches to statistics and how these bear on predictions in cosmology, including Weinberg’s prediction of the cosmological constant. John Peacock, Joe Silk 13 Jul 2016
131 Practical Fine-Tuning In the fourth part of their discussion, Luke Barnes and David Sloan look for ways the fine-tuning problems can lead to advances in physics. Luke Barnes, David Sloan 13 Jul 2016
132 Comparing Theories In the third part of their discussion, Luke Barnes and David Sloan puzzle over the way we compare theories, and whether there can be a theory that doesn’t have some unexplained posits. Luke Barnes, David Sloan 13 Jul 2016
133 New Approaches to Probability In the second part of their discussion, Luke Barnes and David Sloan go over the difference between frequentist and bayesian statistics, and how this difference applies to astrophysics and cosmology. Luke Barnes, David Sloan 13 Jul 2016
134 What Is Fine-Tuning? In the first part of their discussion, Luke Barnes and David Sloan come up with a working understanding of fine-tuning. They also discuss various examples of fine-tuning in physics. This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on May 13, 2016 Luke Barnes, David Sloan 13 Jul 2016
135 Creative Commons Evaluation of HIFU ablation for uterine fibroids A multicenter IDEAL study. Joey Kwong 07 Jul 2016
136 Creative Commons Perioperative Outcomes, Health Care Costs and Survival After Robotic-assisted Versus Open Radical Cystectomy A national comparative effectiveness study Bilal Chughtai 06 Jul 2016
137 Creative Commons IDEAL Framework and Recommendations A template for device evaluation? Christopher Pennell 06 Jul 2016
138 Creative Commons Applying IDEAL Early stage surgical innovation of a novel bio-wrap-assisted vasectomy reversal technique. Ahmet Gudeloglu 06 Jul 2016
139 Creative Commons Small Simple Trials A Strategy to Study Rare Surgical Conditions. James Wright 06 Jul 2016
140 Creative Commons Pilot and feasibility studies Methodological advances in evaluation. Gillian Lancaster 06 Jul 2016
141 Creative Commons An innovative view on surgical research Evaluation surgical innovation of international examples Maroeska Rovers 06 Jul 2016
142 Creative Commons Advancing the cause of Research Registration First 500 Registrations of the ResearchRegistry.com. Riaz Agha 06 Jul 2016
143 Creative Commons Mind the Uncertainty Gap A comparative analysis of HTA of robotic surgery. Tammy Clifford 06 Jul 2016
144 Is Buxton's Law still true? Evaluating evolving surgical techniques within pilot and full RCTs IDEAL surgical innovation in practice. Jane Blazeby 27 Jun 2016
145 Creative Commons Transforming transplantation Organ preservation and reconditioning. Peter Friend 27 Jun 2016
146 Creative Commons Is more evidence always better? The value of adding decision analytical modelling to the IDEAL framework Casper Tax 27 Jun 2016
147 Creative Commons Progressing through IDEAL: When is the right time to move from observational to randomised studies? A case study of REBOA. Jan Jansen 27 Jun 2016
148 Creative Commons Reconstruction of bladder defects with amniotic membrane Step 1-2 of IDEAL recommendations of surgical innovation David Barski 27 Jun 2016
149 Creative Commons Strachey Lecture - Quantum Supremacy Dr Scott Aaronson (MIT, UT Austin) gives the 2016 Strachey lecture. Scott Aaronson 14 Jun 2016
150 Creative Commons The developmental origins of health and disease: adaptation reconsidered Ian Rickard (Durham) places the origins of the science of health and disease within a framework of evolutionary theory and a medical anthropology perspective (18 January 2016) Ian Rickard 08 Jun 2016
151 Creative Commons Regulation of medical devices The application of the IDEAL framework through regulation, commission and policy. Art Sedrakyan 07 Jun 2016
152 Creative Commons Paving the Path for Human Space Exploration: The Challenges and Opportunities The 42nd Maurice Lubbock Memorial Lecture: ‘Paving the Path for Human Space Exploration:The Challenges and Opportunities’ presented by Lauri N. Hansen, Director of Engineering, NASA Johnson Space Centre. Lauri N. Hansen 01 Jun 2016
153 'Relationships' part 2 - New fathers How do new fathers form relationships with their children? What is the unique role of a father? What do they contribute to the development of their children? What is male post-natal depression? Anna Machin 22 Apr 2016
154 What Can We Learn from Planetary Surveys? In the fourth part of their discussion, Suzanne Aigrain and Michael Meyer discuss how we move from observations of exoplanets to conclusions about their types and formation. This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on February 12, 2016. Suzanne Aigrain, Michael Meyer 20 Apr 2016
155 Is Our Solar System Special? In the third part of their discussion, Suzanne Aigrain and Michael Meyer discuss ways in which our solar system is unusual in its makeup and formation. This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on February 12, 2016. Suzanne Aigrain, Michael Meyer 20 Apr 2016
156 Fine-Tuning and the Scientific Process In the second part of their discussion, Michael Meyer and Suzanne Aigrain talk about the way they, as working physicists, think of fine-tuning in complex planetary systems. This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on February 12, 2016. Suzanne Aigrain, Michael Meyer 20 Apr 2016
157 Telescope Design and the Search for Life In the first part of their discussion, Michael Meyer and Suzanne Aigrain lay out the conditions for habitability on an exoplanet and challenges of looking for such planets. This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on February 12, 2016. Suzanne Aigrain, Michael Meyer 20 Apr 2016
158 Life in the Universe: Where and How Can We Find It? In the fourth part of their discussion, Mario Livio and Joe Silk talk about the way planetary systems form and the preconditions for life-bearing planets to exist. This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on February 12, 2016 Joe Silk, Mario Livio 19 Apr 2016
159 Testability, Physics, and the Multiverse In the third part of their discussion, Mario Livio and Joe Silk ask: could our theories exceed our ability to test them? Have they already? This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on February 12, 2016. Joe Silkl, Mario Livio 19 Apr 2016
160 Biosignatures and the Search for Life In the second part of their discussion, Joe Silk and Mario Livio go over biosignatures: things which, if observed, would be evidence for life. This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on February 12, 2016. Joe Silk, Mario Livio 19 Apr 2016
161 Life in the Universe: The Fermi Paradox In the first part of their discussion, Joe Silk and Mario Livio consider the chances of life elsewhere in the universe. They talk about the Fermi paradox and responses to it. This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on February 12, 2016. Joe Silk, Mario Livio 19 Apr 2016
162 Shedding Light on the Situation Light is more than just light bulbs and sunshine! Researchers at the University of Oxford use different types of light to learn more about all sorts of interesting things. Jena Meinecke, Chris Rennick, Brianna Heazlewood, Clarence Yapp 12 Apr 2016
163 Dark Matter Oxford Students discuss Dark Matter. Aled Walker, Peter Hatfield, Fran Day, Talitha Bromwich 04 Apr 2016
164 Fundamental constants and biology George Ellis of the University of Cape Town shows how we can use a space of possibilities to assess the fragility of life. This talk was part of the Consolidation of Fine-Tuning Project's first workshop, "Life in the Universe", on November 3, 2015. George Ellis 02 Mar 2016
165 Are the Humanities More Digital than the Sciences? A panel discussion with Howard Hotson, Andrew Prescott, Dave De Roure and Heather Viles Howard Hotson, Andrew Prescott, Dave De Roure, Heather Viles 02 Mar 2016
166 Assessing Fine-Tuning in Physics: How Many? How Fine? How Come? Bernard Carr of Queen Mary University of London looks at sources of fine tuning in physics and their possible explanations. This talk was part of the Consolidation of Fine-Tuning Project's first workshop, "Life in the Universe", on November 3, 2015. Bernard Carr 02 Mar 2016
167 Too Valuable to Die? Silke Ackermann, Nigel Biggar and Liz Bruton debate the ethics of science and scientists going to war Silke Ackermann, Nigel Biggar, Liz Bruton 14 Oct 2015
168 Periodic Tales Author Hugh Aldersey-Williams, historian of science Jo Hedesan and chemist Peter Battle discuss the ways in which the elements continue to inspire us today Hugh Aldersey-Williams, Jo Hedesan, Peter Battle 13 Oct 2015
169 Painted by numbers: decoding Ferdinand Bauer's Flora Graeca colour code Lunchtime lecture by Richard Mulholland accompanying the exhibition Marks of Genius: Masterpieces from the Collections of the Bodleian Libraries. Richard Mullholland 09 Jul 2015
170 Creative Commons Simon Benjamin on Open Science Simon Benjamin, Associate Professor at the Materials Department, gives an in-depth talk on the importance of Open Science for researchers, students and the general public. Simon Benjamin 09 Jul 2015
171 'Artificial Intelligence' part 3 - Understanding how we learn language Professor Kim Plunkett explains how neuroscientists use artificial intelligence as a tool to model processes in the brain – in particular to understand how infants acquire language. Kim Plunkett 12 Jun 2015
172 Theatre and Evolution from Ibsen to Beckett An interdisciplinary discussion of Kirsten Shepherd-Barr's book Kirsten Shepherd-Barr, Michael Billington, Morten Kringlebach, Laura Marcus 20 May 2015
173 'Artificial Intelligence' part 2 - How to create machines that learn Professor Nando de Freitas explains that understanding how our brains work has helped us create machines that learn, and how these learning machines can be put to completing different tasks. Nando de Freitas 19 May 2015
174 Leviathan and the Air Pump: Thirty Years On The historian of science David Wootton reviews the controversial dispute between Robert Boyle and Thomas Hobbes, followed by a reply from Boyle's biographer Michael Hunter Ritchie Robertson, David Wootton, Michael Hunter 12 May 2015
175 Creative Commons Neuroscience and Psychoanalysis Richard Brown( Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University) and Mark Solms (Chair of Neuropsychology, University of Cape Town) give the fourth talk in the Unconscious Memory series. Richard Brown, Mark Solms 07 May 2015
176 That Other Place: Art and Alzheimer's A short video about a recent exhibition of photography and film Helen Statham, Victoria McGuinness, Nicola Onions 28 Apr 2015
177 'Artificial Intelligence' part 1 - Using artificial intelligence to spot patterns Professor Stephen Roberts explains how machines, whose job it is simply to learn, can help researchers spot scientific needles in data haystacks, which will help us solve some grand challenges. Stephen Roberts 15 Apr 2015
178 'Explosions' part 3 - Health and Big Data Professor Gil McVean explains what Big Data is and how it can be used to better understand and treat complex conditions, such as heart disease and dementia. Gil McVean 30 Mar 2015
179 Humanities and Science: Representing Science An interdisciplinary discussion exploring the many possible approaches to representing science through the arts, as well as potential challenges Kirsten Shepherd-Barr, Heidi Johansen-Berg, Jason Gaiger, Annie Cattrell 17 Mar 2015
180 The Perfect Theory: A Century of Geniuses and the Battle over General Relativity A discussion exploring Pedro Ferreira's book Pedro Ferreira, Harvey Brown, Alex Butterworth, Javier Lezaun 16 Mar 2015
181 Observing by Hand: Sketching the Nebulae in the Nineteenth Century A discussion of Omar Nasim's book Omar Nasim, Stephen Johnston, Martin Kemp, Chris Lintott 16 Mar 2015
182 Wayne McGregor: Neuroscience and Dance Wayne McGregor (Director, Random Dance) talks about his choreographic practice with Dr Phil Barnard, (MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge) and Eckhard Thiemann (Arts Producer). Wayne McGregor, Phil Barnard, Eckhard Thiemann 16 Mar 2015
183 The Seven Wonders of Galaxy Zoo Becky Smethurst shows how citizen science and the Galaxy Zoo project is helping researchers tackle difficult scientific questions. Becky Smethurst 13 Mar 2015
184 Artificial intelligence: examining the interface between brain and machine Dr Anders Sandberg, James Martin Fellow, Oxford Martin Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology, gives a seminar as part of the Oxford Martin School Hilary Term seminar series: Blurring the lines: the changing dynamics between man and machine. Anders Sandberg 24 Feb 2015
185 mHealth: smartphones as saviours? Dr Fred Hersch and Dr Gari Clifford give a seminar is part of the Oxford Martin School Hilary Term seminar series: Blurring the lines: the changing dynamics between man and machine Fred Hersch, Gari Clifford 24 Feb 2015
186 Where next for citizen science? Innovative uses for crowd sourcing Dr Chris Lintott and Dr Brooke Simmons give a seminar as part of the Oxford Martin School Hilary Term seminar series: Blurring the lines: the changing dynamics between man and machine. Chris Lintott, Brooke Simmons 24 Feb 2015
187 Faith and Wisdom in Science A Book at Lunchtime discussion with Tom McLeish, Sally Shuttleworth, John Christie and Ard A. Louis Tom McLeish, Sally Shuttleworth, John Christie, Ard Louis 19 Feb 2015
188 Humanities and Science: Randomness and Order An interdisciplinary discussion exploring the role of randomness and order in physics, probability, history and music. Ian Walmsley, Jonathan Cross, Alison Etheridge, Chris Wickham 18 Feb 2015
189 Creative Commons Oxford and the next-generation of mobile health David Clifton, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, gives a talk for Oxford Martin School. David Clifton 17 Feb 2015
190 Humanities and Science: Mental Health An interdisciplinary discussion exploring the role of the humanities in mental health. Edward Harcourt, John Geddes, Matthew Broome, Emily Troscianko 09 Feb 2015
191 Bridget Ogilvie: Women in Science Dame Bridget Ogilvie discusses her life and illustrious scientific career, at The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics’ Women in Science series Bridget Ogilvie 10 Dec 2014
192 Creative Commons Heidi Johansen-Berg: Women in Science Professor Heidi Johansen-Berg heads the Plasticity Group at the Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB). Her research focuses on how the brain changes in response to damage, learning and experience Heidi Johansen-Berg 10 Dec 2014
193 Creative Commons Irene Tracey: Women in Science Irene Tracey is the co-founder and director of the Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB) Irene Tracey 10 Dec 2014
194 What Maths Really Does: From modelling the brain to modelling the climate - Alain Goriely How has mathematics emerged over recent decades as the engine behind 21st century science? Alain Goriely looks at this question and more. Alain Goriely 04 Dec 2014
195 Science and the Art of Inventiveness Physics Colloquium 24th October 2014. Delivered by Professor Andrei Seryi, Director of the John Adams Institute. Andrei Seryi 01 Dec 2014
196 Part 2: The history of structural biology Understanding the function of a protein is an important step in finding out why the body succumbs to disease – but how do scientists find these proteins and figure out how they work? Jonathan Webb 05 Nov 2014
197 In Her Footsteps - Ellie Williams Dr Mona Bafadhel interviews Dr Ellie Williams, a post-doctoral researcher in the Structural Genomics Consortium, about her career to date. Mona Bafadhel, Ellie Williams 28 Oct 2014
198 In Her Footsteps - Mona Bafadhel Associate Professor Erika Mancini interviews Dr Mona Bafadhel, a Group Head in Respiratory Medicine and Honorary Consultant Chest Physician, about the highlights and challenges of having both a clinical and a research career. Erika Mancini, Mona Bafadhel 28 Oct 2014
199 In Her Footsteps - Erika Mancini Dr Ellie Williams interviews Associate Professor Erika Mancini, a Group Head in the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, about her experiences as a woman in science. Erika Mancini, Ellie Williams 28 Oct 2014
200 Part 1: The Building Blocks of Life Our bodies are made up of trillions of cells but it doesn’t matter how closely you look, you still won’t see them. Jonathan Webb 28 Oct 2014