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# Episode Title Description People Date
101 Tower Poetry 2015: Firewood Third prizewinner of the 2015 Christopher Tower Poetry competition, Lewis Harrington, reads his poem 'Firewood'. Lewis Harrington 14 May 2015
102 Tower Poetry 2015: Purblind Commended winner of the 2015 Christopher Tower Poetry competition, Matt Ward, reads 'Purblind'. Matt Ward 14 May 2015
103 Tower Poetry 2015: Closed Door Commended winner of the 2015 Christopher Tower Poetry competition, Andrew Wells, reads 'Closed Door'. Andrew Wells 14 May 2015
104 APGRD Lecture: Gwyneth Lewis on Clytemnestra Gwyneth Lewis on Clytemnestra Gwyneth Lewis 11 Mar 2015
105 Unbuttoning Catullus A discussion with Dr Gail Trimble, Prof. Nicola Gardini, Josephine Balmer for the OCCT Translation and Criticism strand. Chaired by Professor Matthew Reynolds Gail Trimble, Nicola Gardini, Josephine Balmer, Matthew Reynolds. 01 Dec 2014
106 Creative Commons Translators and Writers - Poetry and the Act of Translation Prof Patrick McGuinness (MML) on pseudo translations and Dr Adriana X Jacobs (Oriental Studies) on rogue translations. Respondent: Kasia Szymanska. Patrick McGuinness, Adriana X Jacobs, Kasia Szymanska 20 Sep 2014
107 Creative Commons Georgians and Others Dr Stuart Lee gives a short introduction to the poetry movements that led up to the War. Stuart Lee 15 Sep 2014
108 Creative Commons The Early Poets Dr Alisa Miller looks at the popular poets in the early years of the War and the way that the press and publishing worlds created a commercial culture in support of the conflict. Alisa Miller 15 Sep 2014
109 Creative Commons War Poetry Dr Mark Rawlinson explores the relationship between War and War Poetry using Owen's famous 'Preface' as the starting point. Mark Rawlinson 14 Sep 2014
110 Creative Commons New Perspectives 1: Georgians and Others Short presentation as part of the Oxford 'British Poetry of the First World War' Spring School Stuart Lee 06 Sep 2014
111 The Queen Shrieks: The Shock of Ancient Egyptian Poetry The Inaugural lecture of Richard B. Parkinson as Professor of Egyptology, accompanied by actress and author Barbara Ewing, on the emotional power of the famous Ancient Egyptian poem "The Tale of Sinuhe" Richard Parkinson, Barbara Ewing 27 Jun 2014
112 Tower Poetry 2014: Schiamachy Runner up to the 2014 Tower Poetry competition, Phoebe Stuckes, reads her poem, 'Schiamachy'. Phoebe Stuckes 03 Jun 2014
113 Tower Poetry 2014: Current Affairs Runner up to the 2014 Tower Poetry competition, Jessica Matthews, reads her poem 'Current Affairs'. Jessica Matthews 03 Jun 2014
114 Creative Commons Tower Poetry 2014: Voyager Runner up to the 2014 Tower Poetry competition, Charlie Holmes, 'Voyager'. Charlie Holmes 03 Jun 2014
115 Tower Poetry 2014: How to Prepare for Bad News Runner up to the 2014 Tower Poetry competition, Alexander Shaw, reads his poem, 'How to Prepare for Bad News'. Alexander Shaw 03 Jun 2014
116 Tower Poetry 2014: Bat Child Found! Third Prize winner of the 2014 Tower Poetry competition, Masha Voyles, reads her poem, 'Bat Child Found!' Masha Voyles 03 Jun 2014
117 Creative Commons Tower Poetry 2014: Hell-of-an Island Second Prize winner of the 2014 Tower Poetry competition, Sam Buckton, reads his poem 'Hell-of-an Island'. Sam Buckton 03 Jun 2014
118 Creative Commons Tower Poetry 2014: Annunciation Winner of the 2014 Christopher Tower Poetry Competition, Dominic Hand, reads his poem entitles 'Annunciation'. Dominic Hand 03 Jun 2014
119 Anna Akhmatova reading her poems about Isaiah Berlin in Oxford in 1965 This podcast is in Russian. This short recording includes 'Cinque' and other poems inspired by the poet's meetings with Isaiah Berlin. Anna Akhmatova 23 May 2014
120 Creative Commons Peter D McDonald in conversation with Daljit Nagra Peter D. McDonald talks to the poet Daljit Nagra about cultural diversity, the contemporary life and history of the English language, the canons of English literature, and translation. Peter McDonald, Daljit Nagra 17 Mar 2014
121 Dorr-e Dari (The Pearl of Dari): An Ethnography of Poetry as a Social Practice among Afghans in Iran (23 May 2013) This lecture formed part of the 2013 Evans-Pritchard Lecture series held at All Souls College, Oxford, in which Zuzanna Olszewska discussed 'Authentic Voices, Modern Selves: An Ethnography of Afghan Refugee Poetry and Personhood in Iran'. Zuzanna Olszewska 13 Nov 2013
122 Creative Commons Why should we study Old English Literature? Dr Francis Leneghan of St Cross College, Oxford, discusses his current research around Beowulf and proposes why we should still study Old English Literature. Francis Leneghan 07 Nov 2013
123 Speaking stories: the oral roots of poetry We'll be looking at Beowulf and the epic as a way of passing on experience and history. See your own life as an epic! Where would you start? What would you leave out? Surprise yourself - and us! Jenny Lewis 04 Oct 2013
124 Creative Commons The poetry of war Explores the aesthetics and impact of war poetry in the early eighteenth century, focussing on Joseph Addison's poem, The Campaign. Abigail Williams 16 Sep 2013
125 Creative Commons The Ladle: a comic poem Matthew Prior's The Ladle was one of the most popular poems of the eighteenth century. This podcast explores its appeal. Louise Curran 16 Sep 2013
126 Creative Commons Pastoral Poetry Introduces the poetry of rural life, and its debt to classical sources. Kathleen Lawton-Trask 16 Sep 2013
127 Creative Commons The life of epigrams This podcasts introduces the popular eighteenth century epigram. Dianne Mitchell 16 Sep 2013
128 Creative Commons Petticoats and fashion An introduction to the world of fashion and the politics of the petticoat, seen through the poetry of the time. Elizabeth Atkinson 16 Sep 2013
129 Creative Commons Language and Medieval literature. The President of St John's College, Professor Margaret Snowling, in conversation with Dr Carolyne Larrington, Supernumerary Fellow in English at St John's. They discuss Carolyne's interest in medieval English literature. Dr Carolyne Larrington 23 Aug 2013
130 Creative Commons FMR 43 Poetry as women's resistance to the consequences of Bedouin displacement in Jordan Bedouin women are able to mitigate some of the consequences of that displacement through the opportunities and influence they have gained as Nabati poets. Maira Seeley 09 Aug 2013
131 The Domain of the Poem: Lyric, Sign, Meaning and Rhythm in Contemporary Ars Poetica (4) Don Paterson, acclaimed poet, gives the fourth and final lecture for Humanitas lecture series on Comparative European Literature. Don Paterson 24 Jul 2013
132 The Domain of the Poem: Lyric, Sign, Meaning and Rhythm in Contemporary Ars Poetica (3) Don Paterson, acclaimed poet, gives the third lecture for Humanitas lecture series on Comparative European Literature. Don Paterson 24 Jul 2013
133 The Domain of the Poem: Lyric, Sign, Meaning and Rhythm in Contemporary Ars Poetica (2) Don Paterson, acclaimed poet, gives the second lecture for Humanitas lecture series on Comparative European Literature. Don Paterson 24 Jul 2013
134 Tower Poetry 2013: Research Luke van den Barselaar reads his entry for the 2013 Tower Poetry Competition. Luke van den Barselaar 10 Jul 2013
135 Creative Commons Tower Poetry 2013: Swimming in Loch Suili; The Lake of Shadows Eva Wallace reads her entry for the 2013 Tower Poetry Competition. Eva Wallace 10 Jul 2013
136 Creative Commons Tower Poetry 2013: The Devil Erin Tunney reads her entry to the 2013 Tower Poetry Competition. Erin Tunney 10 Jul 2013
137 Creative Commons Tower Poetry 2013: Investigation Details; Echo and Narcissus Kathryn Cussons reads her entry to the 2013 Tower Poetry competition. Kathryn Cussons 10 Jul 2013
138 Creative Commons Tower Poetry 2013: Origins Azfa Ali reads her entry to the 2013 Tower Poetry Competition. Azfa Ali 10 Jul 2013
139 Peter D McDonald in conversation with Amit Chaudhuri Peter D. McDonald talks to Amit Chaudhuri about his work as a novelist, critic and musician, focusing on his interest in the specificity of the many media he uses and on the challenge of thinking about cultural interconnectedness in new ways. Peter McDonald, Amit Chaudhuri 05 Jun 2013
140 Peter D McDonald in conversation with Derek Attridge Peter D. McDonald and Derek Attridge reflect on their different approaches to the questions of literature and public value, and on the bearing this has for teaching and research today. Peter McDonald, Derek Attridge 04 Jun 2013
141 Peter D McDonald in conversation with Antjie Krog Peter D. McDonald talks to Antjie Krog about her relationship to Afrikaans, English and African languages, about the promise and perils of translation, and about the challenges of and for writing in a multilingual democracy. Peter McDonald, Antjie Krog 04 Jun 2013
142 Peter D. McDonald in conversation with Arvind Krishna Mehrotra Peter D. McDonald talks to Arvind Krishna Mehrotra about his work as a poet, critic and translator, focusing on the idea of triangulation and his interest in the intersections between languages and literary traditions. Peter McDonald, Arvind Mehrotra 23 Apr 2013
143 Creative Commons From Owen's Doomed Youth, to his doomed youth Lecture at the event 'Wilfred Owen: From Doomed Youth to the Battle of the Sambre'. Imperial War Museum, 10th November 2012. Jean Moorcroft Wilson 27 Feb 2013
144 Creative Commons From Mametz Wood to The General Lecture on Siegfried Sassoon given at the Imperial War Museum, London, 12th November 2011. Jean Moorcroft Wilson 27 Feb 2013
145 Creative Commons The Last Phase A discussion on the last phase of the First World War. A talk given at 'Wilfred Owen: From Doomed Youth to Battle of the Sambre', Imperial War Museum, 10th November 2012. Max Egremont 18 Feb 2013
146 Creative Commons Popular fiction in World War One An argument for a more nuanced assessment of the popular literature consumed by the wider public during the First World War. Jane Potter 10 Dec 2012
147 Creative Commons Kipling, the Elton John of his age? Professor Elleke Boehmer discusses why Kipling's writing, and his poetry of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in particular, launched him to international fame across the British Empire. Elleke Boehmer, Dominic Davies 08 Oct 2012
148 Creative Commons Aime Cesaire and Derek Walcott Jason Allen offers a comparative discussion of two important Caribbean poets and playwrights, Aime Cesaire and Derek Walcott, to emphasize the impact of Caribbean literature upon the postcolonial world. Jason Allen, Dominic Davies 24 Aug 2012
149 Creative Commons Shakespeare and Voice Linda Gates, Professor of Voice at Northwestern University (USA) discusses how Shakespeare's poetry and plays lend themselves to vocal performance by discussing how breath can be used to 'punctuate the thought'. Linda Gates 01 Aug 2012
150 Creative Commons Shakespeare and Voice Linda Gates, Professor of Voice at Northwestern University (USA) discusses how Shakespeare's poetry and plays lend themselves to vocal performance by discussing how breath can be used to 'punctuate the thought'. Linda Gates 01 Aug 2012
151 Creative Commons St Anne's and the Imagination A discussion with Dame Penelope Lively and Professor Patrick McGuinness which took place on Saturday 19th May as part of St Anne's 60th anniversary celebrations. Penelope Lively, Patrick McGuinness, David Smith 30 Jul 2012
152 Creative Commons A Discussion of Emily Dickinson's 'I started early, took my dog'. Dr Sally Bayley presents an illuminating reading of Emily Dickinson's 'I started early, took my dog'. In her reading, she seeks out allusions to Shakespearean plays including Hamlet and The Merchant of Venice. She then answers questions about the poem. Sally Bayley 16 Jul 2012
153 Creative Commons Panel 3 | The Language of Revolution: Poetry as Archive: Egypt's Revolution and Archival Poetics Tahia Abdel Nasser of the American University in Cairo analyses Egyptian poetry from the 2011 revolution and its role as archive and political site. Tahia Abdel Nasser 25 May 2012
154 Creative Commons Great Writers Inspire- An Introduction to the Project A short introductory video to the "Great Writers Inspire project. Joshua Carr 23 May 2012
155 Tower Poetry 2012: Maiden Voyage Millie Guille reads her entry to the 2012 Tower Poetry Competition. Millie Guille 08 May 2012
156 Tower Poetry 2012: The Sirens Tell Their Tale Hannah Tran reads her entry to the 2012 Tower Poetry Competition. Hannah Tran 08 May 2012
157 Tower Poetry 2012: Papa's Epilogue Sarah Fletcher reads her entry for the 2012 Tower Poetry Competition. Sarah Fletcher 08 May 2012
158 Tower Poetry 2012: Postcards Lucy Hely-Hutchinson reads her entry for the 2012 Tower Poetry Competition. Lucy Hely-Hutchinson 08 May 2012
159 Tower Poetry 2012: Balloon Song Bethan Smith reads her entry for the 2012 Tower Poetry Competition. Bethan Smith 08 May 2012
160 Creative Commons Katherine Mansfield and Rhythm Magazine Dr Faith Binckes explains why modernist short story writer and critic Katherine Mansfield (1888-1923) is a great writer, highlighting her involvement with the 1911-1913 periodical Rhythm, edited by her second husband John Middleton Murry. Faith Binckes 07 Feb 2012
161 Creative Commons William Blake Dr David Fallon introduces the poetry, painting, and engraving of William Blake, focusing on the imaginative and visionary aspects of Blake's work and his desire to break the publics 'mind-forg'd manacles'. David Fallon 07 Feb 2012
162 Creative Commons 18th Century Labouring Class Poetry Dr Jennifer Batt gives a talk on Stephen Duck, one of the 18th Century labouring-class poets. Jennifer Batt 07 Feb 2012
163 Creative Commons Cristian Aliaga: Your Virtues Are Your Faults. Poetry Reading (Spanish and English) A reading by Cristian Aliaga, one of Argentina's outstanding contemporary poets, given at St. John's College, Oxford, on 3 November, 2011. English translations are read by Ben Bollig, Lecturer in Spanish American Literature. Cristian Aliaga, Ben Bollig 25 Jan 2012
164 Creative Commons The Joys of Cricket This podcast looks at cricket seen through eighteenth-century eyes, focussing on a poem by James Dance, called 'Cricket: An Heroic Poem.'. Adam Rounce 12 Dec 2011
165 Creative Commons Walcott and Naipaul: History and Myth Catherine Brown, Lecturer in English Literature, compares West Indian writers Derek Walcott and Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul on their attitudes towards history and myth. Catherine Brown 26 Oct 2011
166 Tower Poetry 2011 Wires Elizabeth Johnson, winner of the 2011 Tower Poetry Competition, reads her poem Wires. Elizabeth Johnson 03 Oct 2011
167 Tower Poetry 2011 Simple Abigail Richards reads her entry for the 2011 Tower Poetry competition. Simple. Abigail Richards 03 Oct 2011
168 Tower Poetry 2011 The Breaking Day Molly Underwood reads her entry for the 2011 Tower Poetry competition, The Breaking Day. Molly Underwood 03 Oct 2011
169 Creative Commons This book of starres': biblical constellations in the poetry of Herbert and Vaughan Prof Helen Wilcox (Bangor University) gives the third lecture in the Manifold Greatness" Oxford Celebrations of the King James Bible 1611-2011 lecture series held at Corpus Christi College. Helen Wilcox 14 Mar 2011
170 Creative Commons Mary Shelley - Journal of Sorrow Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. In the months immediately following Shelley's death Mary lived at Albaro on the outskirts of Genoa. Her only regular companions were her young son, Percy Florence, and the journal she began on 2 October 1822. Nouran Koriem 02 Dec 2010
171 Creative Commons Mary Shelley - Journal of Sorrow Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. In the months immediately following Shelley's death Mary lived at Albaro on the outskirts of Genoa. Her only regular companions were her young son, Percy Florence, and the journal she began on 2 October 1822. Nouran Koriem 02 Dec 2010
172 Creative Commons William Godwin- Letter to Mary Shelley Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. This is the letter Godwin wrote to Mary after hearing of Shelley's death. Hoare Nairne 02 Dec 2010
173 Creative Commons William Godwin- Letter to Mary Shelley Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. This is the letter Godwin wrote to Mary after hearing of Shelley's death. Hoare Nairne 02 Dec 2010
174 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Letter to Mary Shelley Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. 'Everybody is in despair and every thing in confusion' writes Shelley in his last letter to Mary. He was in Pisa to discuss a new journal, The Liberal, with Leigh Hunt and Lord Byron. Henry Cockburn 02 Dec 2010
175 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Letter to Mary Shelley Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. 'Everybody is in despair and every thing in confusion' writes Shelley in his last letter to Mary. He was in Pisa to discuss a new journal, The Liberal, with Leigh Hunt and Lord Byron. Henry Cockburn 02 Dec 2010
176 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Adonais. An Elegy on the Death of John Keats Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. This great elegy was prompted by the news of the death of John Keats in Rome, and by Shelley's belief that Keats's illness was caused by the hostile notices his work had been given in the Quarterly Review. Jordan Saxby 02 Dec 2010
177 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Adonais. An Elegy on the Death of John Keats Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. This great elegy was prompted by the news of the death of John Keats in Rome, and by Shelley's belief that Keats's illness was caused by the hostile notices his work had been given in the Quarterly Review. Jordan Saxby 02 Dec 2010
178 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Opening lines of 'The Triumph of Life' Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley worked on 'The Triumph of Life', a dark and visionary poem, while living at the Villa Magni. Hoare Nairne 02 Dec 2010
179 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Opening lines of 'The Triumph of Life' Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley worked on 'The Triumph of Life', a dark and visionary poem, while living at the Villa Magni. Hoare Nairne 02 Dec 2010
180 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Dedication fair copy of 'With a guitar. To Jane' Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley presented this light-hearted poem, copied out in his best hand, with the guitar he gave to Jane Williams in 1822. Jordan Saxby 02 Dec 2010
181 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Dedication fair copy of 'With a guitar. To Jane' Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley presented this light-hearted poem, copied out in his best hand, with the guitar he gave to Jane Williams in 1822. Jordan Saxby 02 Dec 2010
182 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Fair copy of Ode to the West Wind Part of the Shelly's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley's best-known poem was written in Florence in late 1819. Christopher Adams 02 Dec 2010
183 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Fair copy of Ode to the West Wind Part of the Shelly's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley's best-known poem was written in Florence in late 1819. Christopher Adams 02 Dec 2010
184 Creative Commons Who Translates and for Whom? Fourth part of the What is Translation Podcast series. In this part, the question of who is best placed to translate classic texts; academics, poets, dramatists and who is best placed to receive the translation, students, scholars or the general public. Oliver Taplin, Lorna Hardwick 27 Jul 2010
185 Creative Commons Can Poetry be Translated? Third part of the What is Translation podcast series. In this part, the question of whether poetry be translated. Is there something within the original that is lost in the translation? Oliver Taplin, Lorna Hardwick 27 Jul 2010
186 Creative Commons Is there ever a Faithful Translation? Second part of the What is Translation podcast series. In this part, the question of whether there can be a faithful translation; does the act of translating a text change the meaning of the original is discussed. Oliver Taplin, Lorna Hardwick 27 Jul 2010
187 Tower Poetry 2010 - Introduction Kathryn Grant, the Christopher Tower Poetry Administrator, introduces the 2010 Tower Poetry Competition entries. Kathryn Grant 14 Jun 2010
188 Tower Poetry 2010 Love has no Larynx Emily Harrison reads her entry for the 2010 Tower Poetry Competition 'Love has No Larynx'. Emily Harrison 14 Jun 2010
189 Tower Poetry 2010 A Portait Painted Scarfless Julia Goroszeniuk reads her poem 'A Portrait Painted Scarfless', her entry for the 2010 Tower Poetry Competition. Julia Goroszeniuk 14 Jun 2010
190 Tower Poetry 2010 Selkie Katie Woods reads her poem 'Selkie', her entry for the 2010 Tower Poetry Competition. Katie Woods 14 Jun 2010
191 Tower Poetry 2010 Sign Language Hugo Havranek reads his poem 'Sign Language' for the 2010 Tower Poetry Competition. Hugo Havranek 14 Jun 2010
192 C.K. Williams: A Life in Poems (2010 Esmond Harmsworth Lecture) The Annual Esmond Harmsworth Lecture in American Arts and Letters, given by Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winner C.K. Williams on 'A Life in Poems' at the Rothermere American Institute on 24th May 2010. C.K. Williams 28 May 2010
193 Creative Commons War and Civilization Series Lecture 2: War and Poetry Geoffrey Hill is currently Professor of Literature and Religion at Boston University and in 2009 his Collected Critical Writings won the Truman Capote Award for Literary Criticism. Geoffrey Hill 24 May 2010
194 Creative Commons Alisa Miller: 'Selling Patriotism: Rupert Brooke in the First World War' Alisa Miller takes a look at the 'Rupert Brooke cult', examining why this particular poet was so popular during the First World War, both with the general public and the soldier, at home and abroad. Alisa Miller 26 Jan 2010
195 Tim Kendall: 'Ivor Gurney: First War Poet' Professor Tim Kendall considers what composer and poet Ivor Gurney understood by the phrase 'war poet' and how he saw his own work as belonging to (and eminent amidst) a tradition of writing about war. Tim Kendall 26 Jan 2010
196 An interview with Colin Hughes Colin Hughes, author of David Jones: the man who was on the field (1979), discusses his friendship with poet and artist David Jones and his research on the Battle of Mametz Wood. Colin Hughes, Alun Edwards 26 Jan 2010
197 Tower Poetry 2009: Introduction Kathryn Grant, the Christopher Tower Poetry Administrator, introduces the 2009 Tower Poetry Competition entries. Kathryn Grant 01 Oct 2009
198 Tower Poetry 2009: Grey Mile Second Prize winning poem for the 2009 Christopher Tower Poetry Prize Competition, written and read by Iona Twistan-Davies of Matthew Arnold School, Oxford. Iona Twistan-Davies 24 Sep 2009
199 Tower Poetry 2009: Three Guesses Third Prize winning poem in the 2009 Christopher Tower Poetry Competition written and read by Paul Merchant of Tonbridge School, Kent. Paul Merchant 24 Sep 2009
200 Tower Poetry 2009: Villanelle Runner-up poem in the 2009 Christopher Tower Poetry Competition written and read by Sophie Stephenson-Wright of St Paul’s Girls’ School, London. Sophie Stephenson-Wright 24 Sep 2009