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Humanities Division

The Humanities Division is one of four academic divisions in the University of Oxford, bringing together the faculties of Classics; English; History; Linguistics, Philology and Phonetics; Medieval and Modern Languages; Music; Oriental Studies; Philosophy; and Theology, as well as the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art.
The Division offers world-class teaching and research, backed by the superb resources of the University’s libraries and museums, including the famous Bodleian Library, with its 11 million volumes and priceless early book and manuscript collections, and the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology. Such historic resources are linked to cutting-edge agendas in research and teaching, with an increasing emphasis on interdisciplinary study. Our faculties are among the largest in the world, enabling Oxford to offer an education in Arts and Humanities unparalleled in its range of subjects, from music and fine art to ancient and modern languages.

Series associated with Humanities Division

"British" World War One Poetry: An Introduction
2013 Carnegie-Uehiro-Oxford Ethics Conference: Happiness and Well-Being
Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art lectures
Ancient Egyptian Poetry
Ancient History HT2015: Digital Classics
Approaching Shakespeare
Art Across the Black Diaspora: Visualizing Slavery in America
Bio-Ethics Bites
Broadcast Media
Cantemir Institute
Censorship in Literature in South Africa
Centre for the Study of the Book
Challenging the Canon
Cultural Connections: exchanging knowledge and widening participation in the Humanities
D.H. Lawrence
Digital Humanities at Oxford Summer School
Diplomacy and culture at the Ottoman Court
Edward Lear's Feelings
English at Oxford
English Graduate Conference 2012
Ethics in AI
Euthydemus - Platonic Dialogue
Exploring Humanities - The Ertegun Scholarship Programme
Faculty of Classics
Faculty of English - Introductions
Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages
From Conscience to Robots: Practical Ethics Workshops
General Philosophy
George Eliot
Global and Imperial History Research Seminar
Global Poverty: Philosophical Questions
Globalising and Localising the Great War seminar series, 2016-2017
Great Writers Inspire
Great Writers Inspire at Home
Greece in Crisis: Culture, Identity, Politics
Greek and Roman Drama - Theatre History and Modern Performance (APGRD Public Lectures)
Hensley Henson Lectures 2018 - Thomas Cromwell: Enterprising Reformation
Hensley Henson Lectures 2019 Art, Craft and Theology: Making Good Words
History Faculty
History of Art
History of the Eighteenth Century in Ten Poems
Humanitas - Visiting Professorships at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge
Hume's Central Principles
Ian Ramsey Centre for Science and Religion
Ian Ramsey Centre: The Deist Controversy
Ian Ramsey Centre: The Great Debate
Indian Traces in Oxford
Institute for Visual Research
Interviews on Great Writers
Interviews with Philosophers
Introducing the Qur'an
Introduction to David Hume's Treatise of Human Nature Book One
John Locke Lectures in Philosophy
Journal of Practical Ethics
Kant's Critique of Pure Reason
La Bella Principessa: A Leonardo Discovered
Leonard Woolf's The Village in the Jungle (1913): A Day Symposium
Les Liaisons dangereuses in 5x5
Literature and Form
Literature, Art and Oxford
Medea, a performance history (APGRD multimedia ebooks)
Medieval English
Medieval German Studies
Mesoamerican Manuscripts
Metaphor: Philosophical Issues
Modern Fairies
Modern Languages
MSt English Language
Musical Abstracts
Nietzsche on Mind and Nature
Not Shakespeare: Elizabethan and Jacobean Popular Theatre
Oriental Institute
Origins of Nature
Oscar Wilde
Oxford German Exchange Series on Brexit
Oxford Humanities - Research Showcase: Global Exploration, Innovation and Influence
Oxford Writers' House Talks
Philosophical perspectives on the causes of mental illness
Philosophy - Ethics of the New Biosciences
Philosophy of Religion
Philosophy Special Lectures
Photo Archives VI: The Place of Photography
Poetry with Simon Armitage
Power Structuralism in Ancient Ontologies
Practical Ethics Bites
Professor of Poetry
Promoting Interdisciplinary Engagement in the Digital Humanities
Reformation 2017
Reid's Critique of Hume
Religious Epistemology, Contextualism, and Pragmatic Encroachment
Renegotiations of History in light of the 'Greek Crisis'
Research Approaches to Former Soviet States: A Practical Introduction
Rothermere American Institute
Ruskin School of Art
Russian Ab Initio Students: Pre-Course Listening Material
Sacrifice and Modern Thought
Sade, l'inconnu? Nouvelles approaches critiques
Samuel Johnson
Science and Religious Conflict Conference
Shakespeare's first folio
Social Media and Faith
Spain: 1959 - 1992
Staging Shakespeare
Staying Alive: Poetry and Crisis
Stories, Spaces and Societies - Globalising and Localising the Great War
Taylor Lecture
Teaching the Codex
The Beazley Archive - Classical Art Research Centre
The Dragon and The Cross: Christianity in China
The End of Journalism
The English People at War in the Age of Henry VIII
The Fall of the Roman Empire (Bryan Ward-Perkins)
The Global History of Capitalism
The King James Bible Lecture Series
The New Madhyamaka
The Remedy
The Value of Humanities
The View from Above: Structure, Emergence, and Causation
The Zaharoff Lecture
Theology Faculty
Tolkien at Oxford
Transforming Nineteenth-Century Historically Informed Practice
Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics
Uehiro Lectures: Practical solutions for ethical challenges
Unlocking Late Schumann
Voltaire Foundation
War and Representation
Was there a Russian Enlightenment?
What is Tragedy?
What is Translation?
Writers in Dialogue
# Episode Title Description People Date
1 A discussion of ethical challenges posed by AI, involving experts from fields across Oxford - Seminar 1 An introduction by Professor Sir Nigel Shadbolt; The place of Ethics in AI, AI Ethics and legal regulation, Ethics of AI in healthcare Tom Douglas, Carissa Véliz, Vicki Nash, Sandra Wachter 20 Jan 2020
2 Teaching the Codex 22: 2019 Summary Philip Booth (Oxford) gives closing remarks at the 2019 Teaching the Codex colloquium. Philip Booth 16 Dec 2019
3 Teaching the Codex 2019 21: Latin Palaeography 2 (Irish and beyond) Anne McLaughlin (Cambridge) speaks at the 2019 Teaching the Codex colloquium on 'Many Books and Certain Books: Irish Manuscripts'. Anne McLaughlin 16 Dec 2019
4 Teaching the Codex 2019 20: Latin Palaeography 1 (Irish) Anne Marie O'Brien and Andrea Palandri (Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies) speak at the 2019 Teaching the Codex colloquium about the Irish Script On Screen Project. Anne Marie O'Brien, Andrea Palandri 16 Dec 2019
5 Teaching the Codex 2019 19: Arabic Codicology Yasmin Faghihi (Cambridge) speaks at the 2019 Teaching the Codex colloquium about the Islamic manuscript tradition. Yasmin Faghihi 16 Dec 2019
6 Teaching the Codex 2019 18: Armenian Palaeography David Zakarian (Oxford) speaks at the 2019 Teaching the Codex colloquium about colophons in Armenian manuscripts. David Zakarian 16 Dec 2019
7 Teaching the Codex 2019 17: Armenian Palaeography 1 Robin Meyer (Oxford) speaks at the 2019 Teaching the Codex colloquium about Armenian palaeography. Robin Meyer 16 Dec 2019
8 Teaching the Codex 2019; 16: Chinese Palaeography and Codicology Imre Galambos (Cambridge) speaks at the 2019 Teaching the Codex colloquium about teaching with manuscript codices from northwest China. Imre Galambos 16 Dec 2019
9 Teaching the Codex 2019 15: Hebrew Palaeography 2 Judith Olszowy-Schlanger (Oxford) speaks at the 2019 Teaching the Codex colloquium about the aims, methods, and challenges of teaching Hebrew palaeography. Judith Olszowy-Schlanger 16 Dec 2019
10 Teaching the Codex 2019 14: Hebrew Palaeography 1 Stewart Brookes (Oxford) speaks at the 2019 Teaching the Codex colloquium on Hebrew palaeography in a digital age. Stewart Brookes 16 Dec 2019
11 The 2019 Esmond Harmsworth Lecture in American Arts and Letters New Yorker fiction through the decades Deborah Treisman 12 Dec 2019
12 The Art of Erosion Inaugural Lecture of Alice Oswald, Professor of Poetry, held at the University of Oxford Exam Schools. Alice Oswald 09 Dec 2019
13 Essai, roman, film: réflexion sur les métamorphoses de l'écriture Dr Chantal Thomas delivers the 2019 Zaharoff lecture (in french) Chantal Thomas 02 Dec 2019
14 Creative Commons Hornless Cattle - is Gene Editing the Best Solution? In this talk, Prof. Peter Sandøe argues that, from an ethical viewpoint, gene editing is the best solution to produce hornless cattle. There are, however, regulatory hurdles. Peter Sandøe 02 Dec 2019
15 Creative Commons Will War still need us? What Future for Agency in War? Will War still need us? What Future for Agency in War? - an interview with Christopher Coker Solveig Gade, Christopher Coker 27 Nov 2019
16 Rule-Mania in Enlightenment Paris Professor Lorraine Daston delivers the 2019 Besterman Lecture Lorraine Daston 21 Nov 2019
17 Creative Commons Blockchain, consent and prosent for medical research Respecting patients' autonomy is increasingly important in the digital age, yet researchers have raised concerns over the barriers of access to medical data useful for data-driven medical research. Sebastian Porsdam Mann 13 Nov 2019
18 Creative Commons The Age of Amok - an interview with Joseph Vogl Professor Joseph Vogl discusses the phenomenon of ‘amok’ with Anders Engberg-Pedersen. Joseph Vogl, Anders Engberg-Pedersen 04 Nov 2019
19 Creative Commons Philosophy and Nuclear War - an interview with Elaine Scarry Professor Scarry and Jens Bjering discuss philosophy and nuclear war. Elaine Scarry, Jens Bjering 04 Nov 2019
20 Creative Commons War, Aesthetics, Politics – an interview with Vivienne Jabri Professor Vivienne Jabri discusses the relationship between war, aesthetics and politics in relation to contemporary warfare with Christine Strandmose Toft. Vivienne Jabri, Christine Strandmose 04 Nov 2019
21 Creative Commons Genetic Selection and Enhancement Professor Julian Savulescu and Dr Katrien Devolder discuss the use of genetic testing to select which children to bring into the world. Julian Savulescu, Katrien Devolder 04 Nov 2019
22 ‘Arriving before us’: seeing, ingenuity and imagination in Dante: Simon Gilson's Inaugural lecture: During his inaugural lecture, Professor Gilson will show how ideas about vision and cognate faculties such as the wits and the imagination are central to Dante’s masterpiece, the Commedia. Simon Gilson 22 Oct 2019
23 Zaharoff Lecture 2018: Je n'ai pas la tentation du silence Pierre Michon, writer, gives the 2018 Zaharoff lecture. Introduced by Catriona Seth. Pierre Michon 18 Oct 2019
24 Creative Commons 2019 Uehiro Lectures (3/3): Improving Political Discourse (2): Communicating moral concern beyond blaming and shaming Lies, propaganda, and fake news have hijacked political discourse, distracting the electorate from engaging with the global problems we face. These Uehiro Lectures suggest a pathway for democratic institutions to devise solutions to the problems we face t Elizabeth Anderson 17 Oct 2019
25 Creative Commons 2019 Uehiro Lectures (2/3): Improving Political Discourse (1): Re-learning how to talk about facts across group identities Lies, propaganda, and fake news have hijacked political discourse, distracting the electorate from engaging with the global problems we face. These Uehiro Lectures suggest a pathway for democratic institutions to devise solutions to the problems we face t Elizabeth Anderson 17 Oct 2019
26 Creative Commons 2019 Uehiro Lectures (1/3): What Has Gone Wrong? Populist politics and the mobilization of fear and resentment Lies, propaganda, and fake news have hijacked political discourse, distracting the electorate from engaging with the global problems we face. These Uehiro Lectures suggest a pathway for democratic institutions to devise solutions to the problems we face. Elizabeth Anderson 17 Oct 2019
27 From Eugenics to Human Gene Editing: Engineering Life in China in a Global Context In November 2018, a Chinese scientist announced the birth of the world’s first gene-edited babies and sparked outrage across the world. Professor Nie considers how China's complex socio-ethical approach paved the way for this controversial experiment. Jing-Bao Nie 07 Oct 2019
28 Histories of Emergence Ravinder Kaur (Associate Professor of Modern South Asian Studies, Copenhagen) gives a lecture on history and public policy. Ravinder Kaur 29 Sep 2019
29 Wrap up and reflection part 2 Patricia Clavin (Professor of International History, Oxford) gives a lecture on history and public policy. Patricia Clavin 29 Sep 2019
30 Wrap up reflection part 1 Jeremy Adelman (Henry Charles Lea Professor of History, Princeton) gives a lecture on history and public policy. Jeremy Adelman 29 Sep 2019
31 Strange Legacies of Divergence:  The Chinese Gold Mining Diaspora 1850-1910 Mae Ngai (Lung Family Professor of Asian American Studies and Professor of History, Columbia) gives a lecture on ‘Strange Legacies of Divergence:  The Chinese Gold Mining Diaspora 1850-1910’. Mae Ngai 29 Sep 2019
32 Divisions of Labour: the Household and the Economy Peter Hill (Northumbria) gives a lecture on ‘Divisions of Labour: the Household and the Economy’. Peter Hill 29 Sep 2019
33 Household, Wage Labour and Capitalist Transformations in 20th Century Africa Andreas Eckert (Professor of African History, Humboldt-University Berlin) gives a lecture on ‘Household, Wage Labour and Capitalist Transformations in 20th Century Africa’. Andreas Eckert 29 Sep 2019
34 China and the West: Many Great Divergences Joel Mokyr (Robert H. Strotz Professor of Arts and Sciences, Northwestern) gives a lecture on ‘China and the West: Many Great Divergences’. Joel Mokyr 29 Sep 2019
35 Silk and Innovation in Pre-modern China and Europe Dagmar Schafer (Director, Max Planck Institute) and Giorgio Riello (Professor of Early Modern Global History, EUI) give a lecture on ‘Silk and Innovation in Pre-modern China and Europe’. Dagmar Schafer, Giorgio Riello 29 Sep 2019
36 Cosmographical Foundations for the Promotion of Embryo Sciences and Proto- technologies in Pre-industrial Europe and Late Imperial China Patrick O’Brien (Professor of Economic History in the Department of Economic History, LSE) gives a lecture on ‘Cosmographical Foundations for the Promotion of Embryo Sciences and Proto- technologies in Pre-industrial Europe and Late Imperial China’. Patrick O’Brien 29 Sep 2019
37 The Great Intellectual Divergence: Alexander Hamilton and the Global Origins of Environmental Investmentality Eli Cook (Assistant Professor of American History, Haifa) gives a lecture on ‘The Great Intellectual Divergence: Alexander Hamilton and the Global Origins of Environmental Investmentality’. Eli Cook 28 Sep 2019
38 The Great Acceleration in Asia: Beyond 'Coal and North America' Kaoru Sugihara (Specially Appointed Professor at the Research Institute for Humanities and Nature, Kyoto) gives a lecture on ‘The Great Acceleration in Asia: Beyond 'Coal and North America'’. Kaoru Sugihara 28 Sep 2019
39 Asia and the Great Divergence Bishnu Gupta (Professor of Economics, Warwick) gives a lecture on ‘Asia and the Great Divergence’. Bishnu Gupta 28 Sep 2019
40 Water and the Economic History of India Tirthankar Roy (Professor in Economic History, Department of Economic History, LSE) gives a lecture on ‘Water and the Economic History of India’. Tirthankar Roy 28 Sep 2019
41 Industry in the Global South, 1840s-1940s: Unfinished Business William Clarence-Smith (Emeritus Professor of History, SOAS) gives a lecture on ‘Industry in the Global South, 1840s-1940s: Unfinished Business’. William Clarence-Smith 28 Sep 2019
42 Did the Little Divergence within Europe and America contribute to the Great Divergence? Leandro Prados de la Escosura (Professor of Economic History, Carlos III University, Madrid) gives a lecture on ‘Did the Little Divergence within Europe and America contribute to the Great Divergence?’ Leandro Prados de la Escosura 28 Sep 2019
43 The Limits of Reciprocal Comparisons: Money and Trade Finance in the Early Modern Period Alejandra Irigoin (Associate Professor in the Department of Economic History, LSE) gives a lecture on ‘The Limits of Reciprocal Comparisons: Money and The Early Modern Period’. Alejandra Irigoin 28 Sep 2019
44 The World Historical in China’s Twentieth Century: Perspectives on Modernity, Globalization and Globality Rebecca Karl (Professor of History, NYU) gives a lecture on ‘The World Historical in China’s Twentieth Century: Perspectives on Modernity, Globalization and Globality’. Rebecca Karl 28 Sep 2019
45 The Spaces In Between: What is Global about the History of Capitalism? Andrew Edwards (Career Development Fellow for the Global History of Capitalism project, Oxford) gives a lecture on ‘The Spaces in Between: What is Global about the History of Capitalism?’ Andrew Edwards 28 Sep 2019
46 TCHIP Archival Research In this episode, Principal Investigator Claire Holden discusses different kinds of archival research on the TCHIP project. Marten Noorduin, Claire Holden, Eric Clarke 05 Aug 2019
47 Historically Informed Performance and Recordings In this episode, Marten Noorduin talks to Eric Clarke about the different ways in which HIP performers and researchers have engaged with early recordings, as well as some of the work that the TCHIP project has been doing. Marten Noorduin, Eric Clarke 03 Jul 2019
48 Creative Commons Freedom of Political Communication, Propaganda and the Role of Epistemic Institutions in Cyberspace Professor Seumas Miller defines fake news, hate speech and propaganda, discusses the relationship between social media and political propaganda. Seumas Miller 20 Jun 2019
49 One Minute in Haditha: Neuroscience, Emotion and Military Ethics In this special lecture, Professor Mitt Regan discusses the latest research in moral perception and judgment, and the potential implications of this research for ethics education in general and military ethics training in particular. Mitt Regan 19 Jun 2019
50 Creative Commons APGRD/TORCH panel discussion of 'We Are Not Princesses' Nur Laiq (TORCH Global South Visiting Fellow), Hal Scardino (producer) and Fiona Macintosh (APGRD) discuss We Are Not Princesses, a documentary about Syrian women living as refugees in Beirut telling their stories through the ancient Greek play, Antigone. Fiona Macintosh, Nur Laiq, Hal Scardino 18 Jun 2019
51 Episode 8: Death Leaves Signs This episode, the final one of this season, features the work of Palestinian poet Yousif M. Qasmiyeh, author-in-residence at Refugee Hosts. Yousif M. Qasmiyeh, Adriana X Jacobs 14 Jun 2019
52 Episode 7: Living Absences In this conversation with Trinidadian Scottish poet Vahni Capildeo, author of Venus as a Bear (2018), we explore the layered, polyphonous histories of the places we pass through and inhabit. Vahni Capildeo, Adriana X Jacobs 07 Jun 2019
53 The 2019 Sir John Elliott Lecture in Atlantic History Health and disease history of the Caribbean, 1491-1850: two syndemics John R. McNeill 06 Jun 2019
54 Creative Commons Terra Foundation Lectures in American Art 2019 - A Contest of Images: American Art as Culture War (4) The Stones of Civil War Dr John Blakinger speaks about iconoclasm in American history and the vandalism of Confederate monuments. John Blakinger 05 Jun 2019
55 Creative Commons Terra Foundation Lectures in American Art 2019 - A Contest of Images: American Art as Culture War (3) Dismantling the Gallows Dr John Blakinger discusses 'Scaffold', Sam Durant's contentious sculpture. John Blakinger 05 Jun 2019
56 Creative Commons Terra Foundation Lectures in American Art 2019 - A Contest of Images: American Art as Culture War (2) The Body of Emmett Till Dr John Blakinger speaks about the controversy surrounding Dana Shutz's painting of the body of Emmett Till exhibited at the 2017 Whitney Biennnial. John Blakinger 05 Jun 2019
57 Creative Commons Terra Foundation Lectures in American Art 2019 - A Contest of Images: American Art as Culture War (1) Warhol in Safariland Dr John Blakinger talks about demonstrations against the Whitney Museum of American Art related to its connections with the tear gas manufacturer Safariland. John Blakinger 05 Jun 2019
58 Creative Commons 'The Mask of a Very Definite Purpose': Edith Wharton and the Classics The annual Classics & English lecture given in May 2019: Isobel Hurst (Goldsmiths) discusses Edith Wharton and the Classics. Isobel Hurst 03 Jun 2019
59 Episode 6: The .01 Percent In this episode, Israeli poet Tahel Frosh talks to us about her debut poetry collection Betsa (Avarice, 2014), financial crisis, and the value of culture. Tahel Frosh, Adriana X Jacobs 29 May 2019
60 Episode 5: The Cut Out In this episode, I talk to US poet Diana Khoi Nguyen (Ghost Of, 2018) about the perseverance of eels, technologies of printing, and how poetry allows for the possibility that our dead will remain present with us in one form or another. Diana Khoi Nguyen, Adriana X Jacobs 22 May 2019
61 Creative Commons Homer and the Discovery of the Pacific An APGRD public lecture given in May 2019: Henry Power (Exeter) discusses Homeric resonances in the work of Alexander Pope, John Keats, and Thom Gunn. Henry Power 21 May 2019
62 When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer Simon Armitage delivers his final lecture as Oxford Professor of Poetry, reflecting on his own influences as a poet. Simon Armitage 17 May 2019
63 Talking with the Soul: A Dialogue about Life and Death In this Ancient Egyptian poem, a man talks with his own soul about whether it is better to live or die. Read by Barbara Ewing. Translated by Richard Bruce Parkinson. Barbara Ewing, Richard Parkinson 16 May 2019
64 Episode 4: Survival Takes Time Interview with US poet Laura Sims, author of Staying Alive (2016) and Looker (2018) Laura Sims, Adriana X Jacobs 16 May 2019
65 Episode 3: A Language for Grief Interview with Israeli poet Shimon Adaf, author of Aviva-Lo (Aviva-No, 2009). Shimon Adaf, Adriana X Jacobs 08 May 2019
66 Inaugural George Rousseau Lecture - Liberty as equality: Rousseau and Roman constitutionalism Dan Edelstein from Stanford University gives the Inaugural George Rousseau Lecture, the convenor is Avi Lifschitz, Magdalen College. Dan Edelstein, Avi Lifschitz 01 May 2019
67 Creative Commons Religion, War and Terrorism In this New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar, Professor Tony Coady argues that religion does not have an inherent tendency towards violence, including particularly war and terrorism. Professor Tony Coady 01 May 2019
68 Episode 2: We Grow out of the Past Interview with UK poet and translator Sasha Dugdale, author of Red House (2011) and Joy (2017) Sasha Dugdale, Adriana X Jacobs 01 May 2019
69 Episode 1: Like a Zombie Life Interview with the US poet Mike Smith, author of Pocket Guide to Another Earth (2018) and And There was Evening and There was Morning (2018). Mike Smith, Adriana X Jacobs 23 Apr 2019
70 Diversifying Greek Tragedy on the Contemporary US Stage Melinda Powers (CUNY) discusses modern American adaptations of Greek tragedy. Melinda Powers 10 Apr 2019
71 Martin West Memorial Lecture 2019 - Perspectivism and the Homeric simile - Prof Stephen Halliwell Martin West Memorial Lecture 2019 Stephen Halliwell 03 Apr 2019
72 Medingen Manuscripts For the launch of the Polonsky Foundation funded digitisation project of Manuscripts from the German Speaking Lands, Henrike Lähnemann (Oxford) talks about manuscripts from the Cistercian Abbey of Medingen (Lower Saxony). Henrike Lähnemann 27 Mar 2019
73 Second part of the masterclass: The Medingen Manuscripts in the Bodleian Masterclass for the Leverhulme Doctoral Students with Henrike Lähnemann, filmed by Natascha Domeisen. Henrike Lähnemann 27 Mar 2019
74 Trailer: Medieval Manuscripts in the Bodleian A film of a class for 'Publication Beyond Print', the Leverhulme Doctoral Training Centre. Filmed at the Weston Library, Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford, by Natascha Domeisen. Daniel Wakelin, Henrike Lähnemann 27 Mar 2019
75 Creative Commons The Ethics of Stress, Resilience, and Moral Injury Among Police and Military Personnel Professor Seumas Miller sets out how the use of lethal and coercive forces may erode moral character and cause moral injury. Seumas Miller 26 Mar 2019
76 Creative Commons The Dancer and the Ubermarionette: Duncan, Craig and Modernist Performance An APGRD / DANSOX public lecture given in February 2019: Olga Taxidou (Edinburgh) discusses the work of Isadora Duncan and Edward Gordon Craig. Olga Taxidou 25 Mar 2019
77 Creative Commons Classics and Social Justice An APGRD public lecture in October 2017: Nancy Sorkin Rabinowitz (Hamilton College) tells us about her work bringing Classics into prisons. Nancy Sorkin Rabinowitz 20 Mar 2019
78 Creative Commons The Politics of Greece's Theatrical Revolution, ca. 500 - ca. 300 BCE An APGRD public lecture given in April 2018: Peter Wilson (Sydney) discusses the relationship between Greek theatre and politics. Peter Wilson 20 Mar 2019
79 Creative Commons Gestures and Postures: the construction and reception of the tragic in Jean-Georges Noverre's dance-drama Agamemnon Vengé An APGRD / DANSOX public seminar given in November 2018: Nicole Haitzinger (Salzburg) discusses Noverre's use of gesture and the tragic. Nicole Haitzinger 20 Mar 2019
80 Tragedy's Endurance An APGRD public lecture from March 2018: Erika Fischer-Lichte (Freie Universität Berlin) speaks on the subject of her recent book, Tragedy's Endurance. Erika Fischer-Lichte 19 Mar 2019
81 Creative Commons Emily Wilson: A Reading A public reading at the APGRD from November 2017: Emily Wilson (University of Pennsylvania), discusses and reads from her new translation of Homer's Odyssey. Emily Wilson 19 Mar 2019
82 Creative Commons Theatre, 1660-1760 - The Arrival of the Actress David Taylor on the arrival of female actors on the stage. David Taylor 14 Mar 2019
83 Creative Commons Theatre, 1660-1760 - Restoration and Change David Taylor lectures on the reopening of the theatres in the 1660s. David Taylor 14 Mar 2019
84 Creative Commons Race and Empire, 1660-1760 Ruth Scobie lectures on race and empire, 1660-1760. Ruth Scobie 14 Mar 2019
85 Creative Commons Drama and the Theatre, 1660-1760 Abigail Williams lectures on the staging of Restoration drama. Abigail Williams 14 Mar 2019
86 Josephine Balmer: A Reading Poet, classical translator, research scholar and literary critic, Josephine Balmer reads from her latest collection, The Paths of Survival - inspired by the surviving fragments of Aeschylus's lost tragedy, Myrmidons. Josephine Balmer 13 Mar 2019
87 What is Historically Informed Performance? In this introductory episode, postdoctoral researcher Marten Noorduin discusses amongst others the broad history of HIP, the authenticity debate, new sources for research, and what the TCHIP project aims to do. Marten Noorduin 11 Mar 2019
88 Creative Commons Literature and Gender, 1660-1760 Kathleen Keown considers representations of gender in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Kathleen Keown 07 Mar 2019
89 Creative Commons Manuscript and Print, 1660–1760 Carly Watson outlines the material forms in which literary texts circulated between 1660 and 1760. Carly Watson 07 Mar 2019
90 Creative Commons What is a Literary Period? Clare Bucknell considers how we define a literary period. Clare Bucknell 07 Mar 2019
91 Creative Commons Nineteenth-Century Stuff - Dickens, Paperwork and Paper Sorrows Sophie Ratcliffe investigates the material culture of the Victorians, using examples from Charles Dickens. Sophie Ratcliffe 07 Mar 2019
92 Creative Commons What is a War Poem? Kate McLoughlin explores how we might define a war poem. Kate McLoughlin 07 Mar 2019
93 Creative Commons Diaries as Literature - The Case of Virginia Woolf Michael Whitworth considers whether diaries are literature, looking particularly at the diaries of Virginia Woolf. Michael Whitworth 07 Mar 2019
94 Creative Commons Character in Modern Drama Kirsten Shepherd-Barr investigates 'character' in Modern Drama Kirsten Shepherd-Barr 07 Mar 2019
95 Theologians and their audience: persuasion or advocacy? Fourth and final video of the 2019 Hensley Henson series, with Prof Morwenna Ludlow, The University of Exeter. Morwenna Ludlow 07 Mar 2019
96 Creative Commons Brilliant Paradoxes and Corrosive Epigrams; or Why Oscar Wilde Went to Trial Sos Eltis looks at Oscar Wilde’s 1895 trial. Sos Eltis 04 Mar 2019
97 Is there a Moral Problem with the Gig Economy? Is 'gig work' exploitative and injust? In this New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar, Daniel Halliday examines the common concerns from an ethical perspective. Daniel Halliday 04 Mar 2019
98 Loathly Ladies Carolyne Larrington and Fay Hield talk about the loathly lady: the hideous hag who knows the secret that the hero seeks, and whom he must learn how to respect. Carolyne Larrington, Fay Hield, Brian McMahon 26 Feb 2019
99 The long-term implications of President Nixon's healthcare programme A talk on President Nixon's radical new healthcare programme proposed in early 1971. John Price 26 Feb 2019
100 Has American democracy outstripped its institutional foundations? Principles without traction in 21st century governance Winant Lecture in American Government Stephen Skowronek 26 Feb 2019